Turn a 40 Hour Week Into 30 and Stay Profitable

Do you ever get to the end of the day and realize that you didn’t get half of the things done that you intended to get done?

Do you find yourself giving endless streams of orders and then having to spend time following up to make sure everything was really done?

Do you often have to redo work because it was not done correctly the first time by someone else?
Is scheduling a problem?

Managing time in a healthcare practice is an art. Unique problems arise because, as the doctor, your main priority is treating patients. But, how are you supposed to keep your full attention on patients and at the same time stay on top of the crucial administrative work that is paramount to maintaining a thriving practice? The essence of successful time management is the attainment of a level of organization which facilitates the goal of a healthcare practice, a high quantity of well and happy patients.

Simply stated, how well you organize determines how many hours you work and how productive you are during those hours.

If you are having difficulty managing your time, the first action you should take is to keep a time log during a typical work week. While this may be arduous at first glance, you will find it well worth the time and energy you put into it. Carry a small notebook with you throughout the day and log everything you do along with the amount of time you spent doing each. This is best done by logging the events as they happen and avoid trying to reconstruct the information at a later point in time.

At the end of the week, you will be able to look over the information and tabulate how much time was spent on the various activities you engaged in. This exact record will help you isolate areas of the practice that are not being competently handled by your employees and/or are problematic to the point of requiring much of your attention.

The next action you should take is to have each one of your employees keep their own time log, just as you did yours. At the end of the week, you can gather the logs and review the activity of each staff member.

Read part II of this article and find out the key questions you should be asking yourself when you have completed your log. Request “Turn A 40 Hour Week Into 30 and Stay Profitable – Part II” (highly recommended). Scroll to top


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Presenting Treatment Plans – The Do’s and Don’ts

Are you advocating for the patient’s health or his wallet?

How should a treatment plan be presented?

What can a doctor and staff do to ensure a high acceptance rate?

What does all this have to do with sales?

These questions, left unanswered, could potentially cost a practice untold sums, quality of care can suffer, new and repeat business can drop off, office morale can be low and practicing can lose it’s entire purpose if patients are not receiving the care that they need.

Confusion About “Sales” Will Cost Practices a Fortune.

A sale is simply an exchange where all parties involved receive something of value. In healthcare professions, a patient receives care to fix a health problem and/or maintain good health. In exchange for the work done, the staff and doctor are paid.

A successful practice includes doctors and staff who care enough to sell patients exactly what they need. Each doctor is key in the sales cycle because without the doctor diagnosing and planning treatment for the correct care, there would be nothing to sell.

Most confusions stem from the false ideas that people have about sales. High-pressure techniques used by some people can leave a bad impression and make patients/clients want to shy away from buying at all. These techniques are not true sales techniques. In fact, using them can set a doctor up for failure. So to does going out of your way to avoid using any sales techniques at all.

Convincing vs. Selling

Convincing a person that they need to buy something is a different activity than selling them on an idea, service or product. Selling is really nothing more than obtaining agreement. A patient who understands the treatment needed and agrees that it needs to be done — and they are going to do it — is a result of a successful treatment plan presentation. In an attempt to convince a patient to accept a plan, a doctor often talks too much, which in most cases works against him. Good communication, then, becomes a key factor. A doctor using communication skills that serve to enlighten and educate will bring a patient to a point of understanding and agreement.

The Patient vs. The Wallet

Doctors can become so worried about whether or not the patient is going to consider a plan too expensive that they actually neglect giving the patient the true treatment plan. We have not met a doctor who does not consider him/herself a good technician. Yet, when it comes to passing treatment information along to a patient, a doctor can get in a habit of making the presentation more palatable by reducing the plan. Concerns about what the patient might think can get in the way. The wallet, then, becomes the center of attention rather than the exact treatment that the patient needs. Doctors do know what patients need, and this should be clearly expressed to the patient or the likelihood of primarily doing “patch-up” work will enter into the practice.

Plan A or Plan B or Plan C?

The doctor may give the patient too many choices. The patient is not a physician and, therefore, does not know what’s best for him. Patients rely on the doctor to tell them what they need. If the doctor doesn’t do that but gives them a choice between Plan A, Plan B or Plan C, the patient will naturally ask the cost of the different plans and select the least expensive one. Asking a patient to make a choice between a $600 plan, a $350 plan and a $195 plan will cause suspicion. One of the most common misconceptions about doctors is that they’re all rich. A patient may wonder why you would do a $600 plan if a $195 plan will suffice.

Read Part II of this article to see how “Maybe vs. You Need,” “Hesitancy vs. Help,” “Integrity” and much more, coincides with presenting the best treatment plan.” Request “Presenting Treatment Plans: The Do’s and Don’ts – Part II” (highly recommended) Scroll to top


Receive Part II of this article instantly: Presenting Treatment Plans: The Do’s and Don’ts – Part II (highly recommended).

I am interested in this topic. I would like to receive no-cost, no-obligation personalized assistance with presenting treatment plans (highly recommended).