How Valuable is that Employee?

Performance Evaluation in a Practice

Performance evaluation is viewed as a process to ensure a high quality of service to the patients and clients of the practice by fostering personal and professional growth of the staff. A performance evaluation does not necessarily mean that the employee will be receiving an increase in pay. That is not the purpose for the review and should be addressed as a separate issue at another time. This way the evaluation is not linked to a pay raise.

The employee performance evaluation is a broad process covering many aspects of performance. It attempts to provide a fair, equitable and valid approach for assessing the performance of professional employees. It is also designed to provide a sound basis for the recognition of good performance and identification of areas of deficiency which require correction. Each employee should have his/her performance evaluated at least once annually.

The evaluation of performance is a joint effort between the staff and the administration. Through joint participation the greatest possible level of trust and understanding of the performance evaluation process will be achieved. It is believed that acceptance and understanding must exist if the process is to be effective.

The performance evaluation process attempts to measure:

  1. What is the acceptable performance level of a job
  2. Individual strengths and weaknesses as they relate to job performance
  3. Professional and personal development

A performance evaluation is not a cure-all tool. It is important to the function of the organization and execution of the individual’s job. This tool is utilized to initiate dialogue between the supervisor and employee. It helps to monitor progress and provides a sound basis upon which the supervisor can monitor performance, recognize good performance, detect deficiencies, and implement plans to make improvements.

The Process of Performance Evaluation

The process is founded on several important factors:

  1. The staff member’s orientation on:
    1. Organizational goals
    2. The job description for the ideal staff member
    3. The job description for the individual position
  2. Systematic assemblage of data on performance
  3. Evaluation to include:
    1. Assessment of performance
    2. Employee feedback
    3. Measures to correct deficiencies

The new employee will have a review at 30-90 days to provide an assessment of his/her performance up until that point (remarkably deficient performance will be dealt with as soon as it is evident). In most cases, this review will afford the employee an opportunity to make improvements before the next formal review. Formal reviews should, thereafter, be conducted every six months for the first year; then, annually after that; although, more frequent reviews may be required as deemed necessary by the office manager. Each formal review will focus on past performance and a plan for future performance.

Request part II of this article to get a break down for two performance categories to evaluate and what each one entails. Request “How valuable is that employee? – Part II” (highly recommended). Scroll to top

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Marketing: Why are Surveys Important to Your Practice?

Are you as confident in your ability to get a steady flow of new patients into your practice as you are in your ability to provide high quality technical care?

You should know that successful marketing has a technology that, when applied correctly, will get results with the same predictability that you get clinical results on your patients. This technology, whether applied to internal or external marketing, will help you generate a steady flow of new patients. This article contains a brief overview of some of these key marketing techniques used to bring about these results.

Patient Records

By examining your current patient base, you’ll be able to approach and execute your marketing projects with increased confidence. You will find out who uses your services most often and you’ll gain an understanding of their health needs.
Look over the records of patients you’ve seen over the past several months. Collect and tabulate information from the files such as age, occupation, gender, income and location. Doing this will give you an excellent picture of who your patients are, and you can profile your typical patient. Having this information on hand will allow you to tailor your promotion and public relations events to your majority audience.

As you’re collecting information from the patient files, also count and categorize the types of services you deliver to the different groups. This provides you with a deeper understanding of what people in the various demographic categories need and want from you. It will help you decide which services to emphasize in your promotion.

Surveys

The information learned from surveys is your road map to successful marketing and promotion – both internal and external. National surveys provided by trade publications and other agencies can be helpful, but there is no substitute for finding out what the people in your own area are thinking and what would motivate them to walk into your practice.

Read Part II of this article to understand, whom to survey, how to survey, and the different types of surveys to be done. Request “Marketing: How are Surveys Important to Your Practice? – Part II” (highly recommended).

Read Part II of this article to understand, whom to survey, how to survey, and the different types of surveys to be done. Request “Marketing: How are Surveys Important to Your Practice? – Part II” (highly recommended) Scroll to top

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