Optimize Your Marketing

In today’s economic climate a great deal can be said for the benefits of marketing effectively. There are many mediums for marketing a practice – referrals from existing patients/clients are normally the best and most cost effective means of getting new patients/clients. External marketing, such as the Internet, business directories, new resident mailings, bus benches, and even the local newspaper, radio and TV, has worked for some. Some form of one or more of these has proven to be successful in various markets, but not all of them are effective in all markets. Given all this, it is vitally important to know how your new patients/clients are finding out about you, and based on this, you should focus your marketing dollars in the most effective areas.

This brings up the topic of this Hot Tip.

Somewhere on your new patient/client form there should be a little line that says, “How did you find out about our practice?” If you don’t have this line on your new patient/client form, you should institute it right away. Some offices have little check boxes that mention their various marketing activities, and others just offer a blank line to be filled in. However you do it, the purpose of this is for your new patients/clients to tell you which of your marketing tools have been most effective. This is vital information for your promotional and marketing activities, only as long as you do something with it. Unfortunately, many doctors don’t use this information properly.

In fact, the last poll taken in our online journal “The Practice Solutions Magazine”, showed that 54% of those responding said that they “did nothing” with the information that they got from this question on their forms. At the same time, our current poll shows 43% stating that they are increasing the amount of marketing they are doing currently. The poll data seems to support that “marketing for new patients/clients” is important to practice owners but the importance of tracking effectiveness of marketing seems to be missing.

Let’s take up effectiveness of marketing as a running theme and discover how it might be used. A simple starting point would be to actually use the data you have already gathered by doing a quick breakdown of where your new patients/clients came from for the past 6 to 12 months. Assign your front desk person the task of reviewing the files of all your new patients/clients and tabulate their responses to the question concerning what brought them to your office. Once the tabulation is done, have this staff member provide you with a summary of this information – i.e. “45% came from referrals, 20% came from new resident mailings, 10% from Yellow Pages ad, etc.” Use the results from this summary and locate the area(s) that seem to be providing you with the most new patients/clients. Do not be surprised if “referred by a friend or relative” shows up as the number one item – in fact you should be surprised if it doesn’t.

At this point, inspect your marketing budget. How much do you spend to make sure people know how to find your practice? How much are you spending on ads and how many new patients/clients came from that? What kind of materials do you have to stimulate referrals? Examine each area that you are spending your marketing dollars on and what your return is on those dollars. While taking into account the cost effectiveness of each activity, you’ll want to invest more heavily in the area(s) that are giving you the most return. For example, if “referrals” is your number one draw, and the local radio ad is not producing much, how can you shift your advertising dollars into more support activities for referrals? As an example, creating a “Refer a friend or family member” card might be one way to start.

To summarize:

  1. have a means to know where your new patients/clients are coming from;
  2. don’t ignore this data – tabulate and evaluate the information;
  3. invest your marketing budget in the most effective areas based upon the data you gather;
  4. regularly re-assess this information and adjust your marketing plans and investments accordingly.

If you do the above regularly and religiously, you’ll find a steady increase of new patients/clients coming in your door. The first priority is always to strengthen the area that is working best, before looking to add additional avenues.

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Vital Steps for Collecting Money Over the Phone

In any practice, Accounts Receivable exist. Whoever collects money in your organization needs to know that this particular job has a two-fold purpose:

  1. To bring the patient/client’s account current
  2. To maintain sufficient goodwill with the patient/client to ensure his continued patronage and support.

The statistics that can be used to measure how effectively the job is being done are:

  1. Money collected (Amount)
  2. Number of accounts brought current

TELEPHONIC COLLECTIONS PROCEDURES

Your telephonic communication skills are very important. Following are some guidelines and proven techniques that will assist you in being most effective in collecting outstanding payments from your patients/clients over the telephone. 

PRIOR TO THE CALL

  1. Study the patient/client’s account record, and all related documentation to ensure you have ALL the information necessary to make an effective and accurate collection call. Spotting a past due amount on your aging report and then picking up the phone to call the patient/client, without pre-planning, is not a very good idea, as there may be vital information of which you’re not aware. Placing the call without doing your “homework” could result not only in NOT getting paid, but in creating an upset with the client/patient or poor PR for the practice. So, study the file prior to making the call.
  2. Know the correct name of the person with whom you are planning to talk. Make sure that you have his/her complete name, spelled correctly. It is vital to speak with the person responsible for the account, so ensure that you have that data.
  3. Be in the right frame of mind when you place the call. Think positively. Believe that you are going to resolve the account. Do not call in anger, frustration or anxiety. You will get nowhere with your patient/client if you do so. Be both cheerful and professional.

MAKING THE CALL

  1. Introduce yourself and state the purpose of your call.
    Example: “Hello, Mr. Smith? This is Mary Jones from Dr. Nelson’s office. How are you this evening?  I’m calling you about your account. Do you have a few minutes to talk with me about this?”
  2. Be very deliberate in your statement about the account. Do not rush through this or be difficult to understand:“Our records indicate that you have an outstanding balance of $350, and I am inquiring as to when we might expect that payment.”Now give him an opportunity to respond.
  3. Do not make him feel embarrassed or as though he has done something wrong. Do not verbally attack him. Notice that in the above example it states, “Our records indicate…” Avoid statements such as: “I’m calling about the $350 that you haven’t paid us for four months!” This would definitely get you off on the wrong foot with him, and it would be quite difficult to resolve the ensuing conflict.
  4. The tone of your voice is very important. Do not be hostile or angry. Do not think of the client/patient as a “deadbeat” or a big problem. Think of yourself as a problem solver and come across that way. He will see that you are trying to help and will be more willing to help in return.
  5. After you have identified yourself and stated the purpose of your call, STOP!! Don’t say anything more at that point. It may seem like forever, but if you wait for the person to say something, it will go much more smoothly, as he is now having to originate a response to you regarding your inquiry.
  6. Listen to what he has to say. Don’t just hear it, but really listen and understand. It could be that he has already mailed the check, or maybe he was planning to mail it that day. If you come on with a harsh demand for payment, you could stop an already intended payment. So, give him a chance to talk.
  7. If he resists, registers an objection or is just generally uncooperative, let him say everything he has to say. Let him know that you understand, and then handle the objection, confusion or whatever it is by giving him an honest and realistic answer. If you do that, you will get a full picture of what his objections are, and you will have left him with little or no argument to fall back on once you have handled the objections he put forth.
  8. Don’t be brash or punitive. Understand that this is a tough position for him to be in. Don’t harass or attack him. Don’t make a threat (such as a lawsuit), except as a last resort and ONLY if you fully intend to carry it out.
  9. Go over with him the fact that it is to his advantage and benefit to make payment. Let him know that the advantages include: not getting turned over to a collection agency, feeling better because an agreement has been worked out, no harm being done to his credit rating, etc.
  10. Bear in mind that everything he has to say might sound very reasonable. But also remember that those “reasonable” explanations are the very “reasons” why he’s in a bind in the first place. The explanations won’t handle anything.

Fill out the form to learn the remaining 5 indispensable collection call techniques AND to find out the 5 vital steps to take AFTER the call (highly recommended). Scroll to top

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learn the remaining 5 indispensable collection call techniques AND to find out the 5 vital steps to take AFTER the call (highly recommended).









Getting Clients and Patients to Be Accountable for Cancellations

You need to put a system and policy in place to discourage your clients or patients from unnecessarily canceling appointments. First, you should have a company policy that is given to your clients/patients as part of their “Welcome to the Practice” handout, letting them know what is considered a no-show—usually less than 24 hours’ notice—and what happens when a no-show occurs. It is important to make sure that your clients/patients are aware of this policy before enforcing it, or you might create an upset.

Clients or patients who wish to cancel an appointment on short notice or who fail to come to a confirmed appointment need to be gently challenged on missing that appointment. An attempt should be made to get them to keep the appointment if at all possible, and if that doesn’t work, they should be notified of the $25.00 fee to be collected at or prior to the next visit. If the client or patient still wishes to cancel, he or she is to be rescheduled. The fee should only apply if the client/patient has already been given his/her “first-offense warning.” The idea behind the fee is NOT to anger the person or make the person wrong but to inform him or her that you are serious about the importance of appointments being kept and completing a course of treatment on time.

The script would be something like this: “You can’t keep your appointment? Oh dear! The doctor has this time set aside especially for you. Is there anything you can do to make it?” If that doesn’t work, move into the missed-appointment-fee handling.

  1. For the first offense, the office policy is to waive the fee. The client/patient should be notified of this, and it must be documented in the chart by the receptionist. The ideal way to approach the individual is by saying, “Mr. Jones, it is our office policy to charge $25.00 for late cancellations or missed appointments; but since this is your first offense, we will waive the fee. Now, let’s get you rescheduled. . . .” This message should be practiced so as to be said all at once and in one breath. The entire message should be delivered before the person can interrupt. This part is very important. You should have the client/patient chart in front of you so that you can be accurate in telling the person of his first offense and the waiving of the fee. If you do not have the client/patient chart in front of you, treat the person as if this were the first offense and note it in the chart.
  2. For the second offense, a client or patient will be called by the OM because a second failure may mean that the person is upset or unclear about something in the treatment. Please give the chart to the OM so the client/patient can be called that day. This must be documented in the chart.
  3. For the third offense, the client/patient will be sent a letter that will require a $25.00 payment for missing the appointment, plus a $25.00 payment to be held as credit for the next appointment, for a total of $50.00. This must be documented in the chart.

If you have any questions regarding this procedure or its implementation, fill out the form to schedule a free call and we would be happy to assist you.

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If you have any questions regarding this procedure or its implementation, fill out the form to schedule a free call and we would be happy to assist you. (highly recommended).







Discussing Payment with the Patient/Client: How to be Both Polite AND Effective

You should always assume that a patient/client can afford the recommended treatment when discussing payment with him. Don’t be shy, embarrassed or apologetic about the cost of your services. This can give the appearance that the treatment isn’t worth the fee being charged.

When making financial arrangements, your goal should be to collect the entire fee at the time of service via direct payment and/or verified insurance reimbursement. You should have a well-defined financial policy for patients to read and agree to with regard to payment of service.

It is important that the accounts manager does not give the patient/client the opportunity to say “no”. Never say, “Would you like to take care of that today?” Instead, give her options that are compatible with office policy. For example:

“Mrs. Smith, the fee for today is $50. Will you be paying with cash, check or credit card?”

With such an approach, “no” is simply not an option. Remember, if you make clear financial arrangements in the first place, you won’t have any trouble collecting the amount due.

Suppose there was a misunderstanding and the patient/client tells you she can’t afford to pay the entire balance at the conclusion of the visit. Your reply might be,

“Could you tell me how much you are able to pay at this time?”

The idea here is to get the largest payment possible. Now you need to secure the balance:

“Mrs. Smith, that will leave a balance due of $560. We need to work out an agreement on how that will be taken care of.”

When she agrees to a definite date for the payment of the balance, put the information on a financial agreement form and have her sign it.

If it becomes necessary to offer a monthly payment plan to a patient/client, adhere to the payment schedule as governed by office policy. Do not stray from the established policies.

Fill out the form to learn (1) what to do if someone REALLY can’t afford your service and (2) how to address insurance reimbursement issues with your clients/patients (highly recommended). Scroll to top

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Fill out the form to learn (1) what to do if someone REALLY can’t afford your service and (2) how to address insurance reimbursement issues with your clients/patients (highly recommended).








Get Your Promotion Organized: A Promotion and Marketing Calendar – Part 1

Have you ever noticed that you have all sorts of great marketing and promotional ideas that you just never seem to put into action?

Do you realize during a staff meeting that those brilliant ideas that captured everyone’s attention and agreement in the previous meeting haven’t even been thought of again until just now?

Have you ever come to the end of a month and realized only then that you didn’t get around to doing much marketing or promotion at all? If so, you’re not alone!

While the specific reasons for failure to successfully carry out promotional actions vary from one practice to another, the most common cause is simply the failure to write them down on a marketing calendar designed to pinpoint what actions will be taken…and when.

A Promotion and Marketing Calendar is a potent, yet uncomplicated, tool.

It designates and specifies those agreed-upon activities which, when performed by the staff, will bolster the flow of new patients/clients into the practice.

By logging an idea on the calendar when it is conceived, it becomes concrete, agreed-upon, predicted, planned for, etc. The calendar helps to maintain control and structure in the Promotion Department and acts as a communication tool for the rest of the staff, as it is there in writing for all to see.

The Director of Promotion (if you don’t have one, get one) would be in charge of seeing to it that all pertinent information is entered on the promotion calendar. He would bring it to the staff meeting each week and review those activities and events that are either in progress or being planned.

The promotion and marketing of the practice is an ongoing activity.

The marketing calendar should be kept full of activities for at least 6 months ahead so that the practice always has some type of promotional actions occurring.

The items on the marketing calendar could include, but would not be limited to, such things as:

  • Open Houses
  • Client/Patient Appreciation Day (Week or Month)
  • Direct Mail Out projects
  • Newsletter preparation and distribution
  • Special days and PR functions for that day (e.g. Valentine’s Day, Grandparents Day, Secretaries’ Day, etc.)
  • Dental Health Month (and associated plans, projects)
  • National Pet Month
  • Educational Letter Series production and distribution schedule
  • Reminders to the staff to stimulate referrals
  • Staff games for activities such as prospecting and referrals

Click here to fill out the form and receive specifics on the TYPE of calendar to use and HOW to use it to ensure your marketing gets DONE (highly recommended).

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Fill out the form to continue reading the specifics on the TYPE of calendar to use and HOW to use it to ensure your marketing gets DONE. (highly recommended).








How to increase efficiency, productivity and net profit in a private practice

There is an impression with healthcare practitioners everywhere that all a practice has to do to increase production is to increase the number of new patients. More new patients is often the universal solvent for an under-producing office.

However, attracting new patients is only 1 of 7 areas of a practice that lead to the efficiency, productivity and the overall net of a practice. There are 6 other areas of a practice that a doctor/practice owner can improve on to increase the profitability and gross income of an office without seeing a single increase in new patients. This does not mean that attracting new patients should be ignored, but what it does mean is that the other areas of the practice should be addressed with just as much importance as the new patient area. In order to improve those areas one must, for starters, know what those areas are. Below you will see the basic actions of each of these areas.

Personnel: A practice owner should know how to hire the right staff and know when and how to fire staff that aren’t productive. Holding onto non-compliant and under productive staff, at a time when unemployment is still high in most areas of the country and the employment pool is more qualified that it’s been in 25 years, is both poor management and foolish. A practice owner can learn how to monitor staff productivity and not judge staff on “feelings” or what other people say about certain staff. Learning how to objectively manage is a key to a productive, efficient and happy office. Part of this is knowing how to train staff on their jobs with proper job descriptions. Having known and applied office policy can make a staff operate in a coordinated fashion and work together as a team resulting in higher productivity and morale. How you hire, train, monitor and take care of your staff is the basic concept of this area. Making this area work properly requires good job descriptions and office policies that are known and understood by all staff as well as having effective statistical monitoring systems for all areas of the office, a good internal communication system and good communication skills by those managing the practice.

Treatment: Exams must be comprehensive and relationships must be built in a very limited amount of time. Value must be demonstrated through excellent care and communication by all personnel involved in any aspect of treatment delivery. Five minutes of sincere, honest and meaningful communication is worth more than 30 minutes of superficial chitchat. Treatment must be top notch using up to date methods and equipment. This area is the province of the doctor and where the “Doctor Hat” is worn.

Enrollment: A practice can increase the quality of case presentations and show more value for the services they are delivering through very simple, basic communication and sales skills. There is still plenty of money being spent these days. A practice must be better at showing value than a competitor down the street. A successful practice never makes a patient feel uncomfortable or pressured through poor case presentation and sales skills. Proper case presentation results in patients/clients knowing what they need and wanting the service and willing to look at how to work out the economics of the service needed. Also, having a good recall system and an excellent patient reactivation program can increase a practice’s production by one third or more.

Part two of this article will cover financial management, marketing, quality control actions, personnel and your actions as an owner and executive that are vital to running a more efficient and viable practice.

Fill out the form to the right and receive “How to increase efficiency, productivity and net profit in a private practice – Part II” (highly recommended). Scroll to top

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Marketing and Promotion Ideas for Your Practice

In my nearly 23 years of delivering practice management training and consulting, I’ve found that of all of the marketing techniques available, properly asking for referrals is easily one of the most useful marketing and promotional ideas for your practice. There are several reasons for this:

  1. It is the least expensive. You don’t have to create and buy ads, make newsletters, send mailings, etc.
  2. It is something that you can directly affect on an ongoing daily basis and see and monitor the results without much time lapse.
  3. It is something that you can train all of your staff to do. You can create reward systems to enhance the staff to do more of it.
  4. You can, more than any other way, attract the type of patient/client that you want. If you analyze the patients/clients in your practice, you can quickly isolate those who are the most cooperative, financially secure and the most fun to have around. These people will, by referral, bring in similar types of new patients.

The whole trick to getting referrals is nothing more complicated than ASK FOR THEM. This can and should be done as a coordinated team effort by all staff. There are many successful actions that you can implement in order to accomplish this.

To get referrals, first, determine which patient/client will be approached. A quick staff meeting at the start of the day can identify patients/clients who’ve had great results and are very happy with their service. Those satisfied people are the ones that you would want to approach. Next, determine who will talk with one of these people. It may likely be the receptionist who will be talking with the person after their appointment. Lastly, work out a simple script that can be used and have a card ready to give out to the person that they can then give to their referral.

Other Marketing Ideas

The following is a list of other successful actions that you can do to promote your practice and get new patients. They are all very inexpensive and easy to do:

  • Ask for referrals!
  • Ask for referrals!
  • Ask for referrals! (ok, point made).
  • Send patients birthday cards.
  • Send out a quarterly newsletter that educates patients.
  • Put up a new patients/clients welcome board in the reception room.
  • Put up a “Thank you for referring” board in reception listing out the patients/clients who referred new patients to the practice.
  • Send thank you letters to every patient/client who referred anyone into the practice.
  • Reward referring patients/clients by sending them to dinner, the movies, etc.
  • Provide a staff reward for generating referrals.
  • The doctor and staff should hand out business cards anywhere and everywhere that is appropriate.
  • Post your practice mission statement in your reception room.
  • Make post-care calls to patients/clients to ensure that they are doing well. This shows you really care.
  • Give tours of the office to school children.
  • Offer family discounts for cash patients.
  • Put up educational posters in all treatment rooms or areas to educate patients about the health care you deliver.
  • Have TV monitors with educational videos that are on a continuous playback loop showing in reception and/or treatment rooms.
  • Have a patient/client appreciation month.
  • Participate in health fairs.
  • Give brisk service with lots of care and affinity.
  • Have all staff who are on the phone always “smile on the phone.”
  • Stay in good communication with any patient or client who is waiting – never let them just sit in silence for any long period.
  • Never make patients/clients wait. Deliver on time.
  • Call your patients/clients by name.
  • Develop a logo and place it in every possible place you can – letterhead, newsletter, business cards, posters, etc.
  • Call patients/clients 2 weeks and then 2 days prior to recall appointments.
  • Confirm appointments the day before.
  • Have simple informational pamphlets. Create your own if you have to.
  • Make follow-up calls after sending a postcard mailer.
  • Use over oversized or odd-sized business cards. People will notice and remember them more than a normal card.
  • Take photos of happy patients and clients and place them on the bulletin board.
  • Have the doctor write a column for a local newspaper or other publication addressing issues within your profession.
  • Share successful results of patient delivery with your staff.
  • Once per year, offer 10% off for payment in full on all old accounts receivables.

All of the above actions will cost you very little up front and will generate the highest quality patients for your practice. Put these into place and you will see your new patient numbers not only increase, but the quality of your patient base will increase.

If you would like no-cost, no-commitment tips on how to effectively implement this information into my practice, fill out the form to the right, and we will be more than happy to assist you.

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The Underrated Business Card

Business cards don’t seem to be in vogue as of recently, however they are still a highly effective tool for getting your name out there. Everyone in the practice should be attentive to any and all opportunities to promote the practice. One of the easiest methods for doing so is handing out business cards. This is a successful tool and is also a commonly accepted practice in the business world.

Initially, each staff member could be given some of the doctor’s cards to distribute. Advise the staff to keep an ample supply of cards in their purse or wallet. Opportunities to hand them out will present themselves in a number of various situations. For example, when a person asks, “What line of work are you in?” The staff member (and doctor) could answer the question, say a little about the practice, and offer a business card or two.

One can take advantage of every day situations to hand them out, e.g., while at the grocery check-out counter and engaged in social conversation with the clerk, at the beauty salon, at the gas stations, the bank, etc. The list could go on and on. The idea is to keep a flow going all of the time. Many practices have been built and expanded in just this fashion.

As your budget allows, print business cards for each of the staff with their names and positions on them. This instills in each staff member a feeling of importance and professionalism. They will also experience a heightened sense of pride when handing out one of their own cards.

A staff meeting should be held during which the significance of new patients/clients is discussed. Impress upon the staff that as each person takes more initiative for building the practice, everyone will experience the increased benefits. Establish “games” for the staff wherein the staff who distributes the most cards and brings in the most new patients/clients is rewarded with cash or some other valuable prize.

The most successful method of using cards to attract new patients/clients to the practice (and to determine whose card they came in on) is to have an offer printed on the back of the business cards which extends to the recipient either a complimentary initial visit or a substantial discount on the first visit. The prospect should be informed to bring the card in with them to the first appointment. The receptionist could then record the name of the staff member as the referring source.

Request the second part of this article to get guidelines on creating a successful business card. Request “The Underrated Business Card – Part II” (highly recommended). Scroll to top

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Marketing: Why are Surveys Important to Your Practice?

Are you as confident in your ability to get a steady flow of new patients into your practice as you are in your ability to provide high quality technical care?

You should know that successful marketing has a technology that, when applied correctly, will get results with the same predictability that you get clinical results on your patients. This technology, whether applied to internal or external marketing, will help you generate a steady flow of new patients. This article contains a brief overview of some of these key marketing techniques used to bring about these results.

Patient Records

By examining your current patient base, you’ll be able to approach and execute your marketing projects with increased confidence. You will find out who uses your services most often and you’ll gain an understanding of their health needs.
Look over the records of patients you’ve seen over the past several months. Collect and tabulate information from the files such as age, occupation, gender, income and location. Doing this will give you an excellent picture of who your patients are, and you can profile your typical patient. Having this information on hand will allow you to tailor your promotion and public relations events to your majority audience.

As you’re collecting information from the patient files, also count and categorize the types of services you deliver to the different groups. This provides you with a deeper understanding of what people in the various demographic categories need and want from you. It will help you decide which services to emphasize in your promotion.

Surveys

The information learned from surveys is your road map to successful marketing and promotion – both internal and external. National surveys provided by trade publications and other agencies can be helpful, but there is no substitute for finding out what the people in your own area are thinking and what would motivate them to walk into your practice.

Read Part II of this article to understand, whom to survey, how to survey, and the different types of surveys to be done. Request “Marketing: How are Surveys Important to Your Practice? – Part II” (highly recommended).

Read Part II of this article to understand, whom to survey, how to survey, and the different types of surveys to be done. Request “Marketing: How are Surveys Important to Your Practice? – Part II” (highly recommended) Scroll to top

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How to take ownership of your Google+ and Yelp pages

How to take ownership of your Google+ and Yelp pages

Over the past few months we’ve done several articles about consumer reviews and their importance. A question I often get asked has to do with claiming one’s business page in Google+ and Yelp.

Many practice owners aren’t even aware that they have a page on Google+ and/or Yelp. It costs you nothing to manage and maintain these pages, and it offers many benefits.

The place to start is to make sure that you have both a Google account which is used for Gmail, Google Calendar, Google Drive, etc. and a Yelp user account. Both accounts are free. If you don’t have any kind of Google account, go to http://plus.google.com, then click the “Create account” link for a free account.

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This is done the same way with Yelp, go to http://www.yelp.com, then register for a free user account.

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Once you have an account, go back to http://plus.google.com or http://www.yelp.com and LOG IN.

Once you are logged in to Google+, use the search area at the top of the page to search for your business.

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When you are on the page for your business, you will see the following notice. Click on the button that says “Manage this page.”

This will take you through a series of validation questions to make sure that you are indeed the owner of the business. Once you are validated, you will be able to navigate back to the page and upload pictures, add the company profile/bio and add relevant information to the page. As consumer reviews happen, you will also be able to reply to them, add notifications and videos, and keep the page up to date.

Once you are logged in to Yelp, use the search area at the top of the page to search for your business.

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When you are on the page for your business, you will see the following notice. Click on the button that says “Claim This Business.”

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This will take you through a series of validation questions to make sure that you are indeed the owner of the business. Once you are validated, you will be able to navigate back to the page and upload pictures, add the company profile/bio and add relevant information to the page. As consumer reviews happen, you will also be able to reply to them, etc.

Doing this will put you in control of your business pages on these sites and make them into usable information hubs for your business.

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