Your Responsibility to Your Staff

Just as your staff has responsibilities to you and your practice, you likewise have several responsibilities to your practice and staff.

The complexity of active leadership can be best understood by breaking it down into its essential and integral parts:

1. Communication: It is vital for the owner of a practice to maintain excellent communication with his/her staff and to provide active and visible leadership. The following are key elements involving communication that you, as an executive, should implement:

a. Communication of Goals.
Determine the purpose of your practice (most often presented in the form of a mission statement) and communicate that to your staff. Impart the goals of the practice to the staff and keep them informed of the projects that you intend to implement to achieve those goals. The better informed your staff is and the greater understanding they have of such matters, the more likely they will be working in tandem with you.
b. Communication Tools.
There are some fundamental communication tools to implement in the practice; see to it that your staff uses them. These tools can be established and maintained by your office manager; but, as the senior executive and leader of the practice, you must reinforce them. Examples of those tools are: written requests or proposals, written office communications, written office policies and the use of an effective communication relay system.
c. Responding to Communication.
It is vital that you and your staff respond swiftly to written communication. When people do not receive a reply to their memos or emails within an appropriate and reasonable period of time, thereafter they become less willing to communicate. As a result, the business can have more problems on its hands. (Keep that in mind when reading the second part of this article.

2. Staff Meetings: It is also vital that you ensure that the practice holds staff meetings once per week. This is one of the most valuable opportunities available to you for educating staff, setting goals and targets, and handling problem areas that should be addressed by the staff as a whole. The communication lines within the business will strengthen considerably too.

You, as the owner and leader, in addition to your office manager, should continually strive to establish strong coordination and leadership for your staff. Any problems or disagreements between the owner and office manager should always be sorted out OUTSIDE of the staff meeting and should never be addressed in the presence of any staff.

Staff meetings run most effectively if the owner and office manager meet prior to the staff meeting to plan and coordinate those matters to be addressed with the staff.

Fill out the form on this page to read the rest of this article and find out why writing and implementing Policy in your practice, as well as setting Goals and Targets successfully, is so vital to achieving expansion. (highly recommended). Click to scroll to the top of the page.

hot-tips-tps-checkbox-1

Fill out the form read the other half of this article.










Looking Toward the Future: How to Make Your Practice Salable

If you are a practice owner, you should know that, in most cases, getting in is easier than getting out. That is, exiting a practice is often more difficult than building it. Exiting is a process, not an event, that should be planned far in advance of the day you turn the keys over to someone else.

The factors that make your practice salable include a good management team, steady profits, patient/client loyalty, a solid reputation, predictable transferability and much more.

With these factors in mind, let’s look closely at ten vital actions that you should take NOW, so that when the time arrives, you will have developed a truly marketable and valuable practice.

  1. MAINTAIN STRONG REFERRAL SOURCES

Professional relationships add tremendous value to a practice. Do professionals in your community routinely refer their patients/clients to you? If so, are those relationships so strong that you can bridge them over to a new owner?

For example, if you have several professionals who reliably refer a significant number of patients/clients to you, you would want to ensure that those referral sources will continue to send patients/clients to the new owner. Otherwise, your prospective buyer might want to factor in a sale price reduction that takes into account the loss of the projected income represented by those referral sources.

Most professionals will continue to refer to the practice after your departure, as long as they are assured that the clients/patients they refer will receive the same good care that you currently provide them. It is also important for your referral sources to know that the new owner will reciprocate with referrals to them (if that is the type of relationship you currently have).

Maintaining your referral relationships and then transferring them to a new owner during transition will help your patients/clients too. By doing so, you maintain both continuity and quality of care for them, and that fosters tremendous goodwill.

  1. MAINTAIN FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT

Generally speaking, people are inclined to pay more for something if it looks attractive. The same principle applies when buying a practice. If your facilities are pleasing to the eye, you might be able to command a higher price. While a clean carpet is only just that, it might demonstrate to the buyer that every aspect of your facility and practice is probably well maintained.

Well-maintained, state-of-the-art equipment also speaks well of you. It says that you have a growing practice that is keeping in step with technology.

  1. INCREASE YOUR GROSS SALES

The best indicator of the value of a practice is its cash flow. Your successor will want assurance that he is acquiring a reliable income stream. Now is the time to concentrate on reactivation of old patients/clients, increasing your marketing budget to attract new patients/clients, setting goals for the staff and moving the practice toward maximum productivity.

  1. IMPROVE YOUR BOOKKEEPING RECORDS

Part of selling a practice requires that you develop and present an accurate picture of what you have accomplished. In order to command the best possible price, you must be able to prove that the practice is highly profitable.

Plan to have at least five years’ worth of strong financials as the buyer wants predictability. Have an accountant prepare “compiled statements.” That lends credibility. The practice buyer will want well-maintained, accurate accounting records to help with future planning. Additionally, thorough records can even help you explain a slump period.

  1. DECREASE OVERHEAD EXPENSES

Analyze your payroll, department by department, function by function, employee by employee. If personnel are underutilized, eliminate a job position and reassign its duties to other employees.

Improve your bookkeeping procedures so that you can readily and accurately track your expenses and potentially cut them. Eliminate nonessential monthly expenses, taking care not to hinder expansion activities. Keep a close eye on your discretionary expenditures, such as advertising, travel, new equipment, seminars, utilities, telephone, etc. By decreasing the overhead of the practice, you will consequently improve cash flow and thus be likely to sell your practice for a higher price. You gain a tremendous amount of control by just knowing where your money is coming from and where it is going.

Fill out the form to the right to read “Looking Toward the Future: How to Make Your Practice Salable”(highly recommended). Scroll to top

hot-tips-tps-checkbox-1

Fill out the form to continue reading this article Looking Toward the Future: How to Make Your Practice Salable (highly recommended).