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Your Responsibility to Your Staff

Just as your staff has responsibilities to you and your practice, you likewise have several responsibilities to your practice and staff.

The complexity of active leadership can be best understood by breaking it down into its essential and integral parts:

1. Communication: It is vital for the owner of a practice to maintain excellent communication with his/her staff and to provide active and visible leadership. The following are key elements involving communication that you, as an executive, should implement:

a. Communication of Goals.
Determine the purpose of your practice (most often presented in the form of a mission statement) and communicate that to your staff. Impart the goals of the practice to the staff and keep them informed of the projects that you intend to implement to achieve those goals. The better informed your staff is and the greater understanding they have of such matters, the more likely they will be working in tandem with you.
b. Communication Tools.
There are some fundamental communication tools to implement in the practice; see to it that your staff uses them. These tools can be established and maintained by your office manager; but, as the senior executive and leader of the practice, you must reinforce them. Examples of those tools are: written requests or proposals, written office communications, written office policies and the use of an effective communication relay system.
c. Responding to Communication.
It is vital that you and your staff respond swiftly to written communication. When people do not receive a reply to their memos or emails within an appropriate and reasonable period of time, thereafter they become less willing to communicate. As a result, the business can have more problems on its hands. (Keep that in mind when reading the second part of this article.

2. Staff Meetings: It is also vital that you ensure that the practice holds staff meetings once per week. This is one of the most valuable opportunities available to you for educating staff, setting goals and targets, and handling problem areas that should be addressed by the staff as a whole. The communication lines within the business will strengthen considerably too.

You, as the owner and leader, in addition to your office manager, should continually strive to establish strong coordination and leadership for your staff. Any problems or disagreements between the owner and office manager should always be sorted out OUTSIDE of the staff meeting and should never be addressed in the presence of any staff.

Staff meetings run most effectively if the owner and office manager meet prior to the staff meeting to plan and coordinate those matters to be addressed with the staff.

Fill out the form on this page to read the rest of this article and find out why writing and implementing Policy in your practice, as well as setting Goals and Targets successfully, is so vital to achieving expansion. (highly recommended). Click to scroll to the top of the page.

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Fill out the form read the other half of this article.










How to Deal with Canceled or Rescheduled Appointments

One of the most common problems doctors want help with is dealing with canceled or rescheduled appointments. If a doctor’s office has too much of this occurring it can wreak havoc on their daily production. Normally, when this is occurring it is a sign that the receptionist is not properly trained in scheduling appointments, managing the appointment book, or handling cancelations and rescheduling.

When you are getting a high volume of cancelations, you should ask yourself these questions:

  • Does your receptionist immediately reschedule a canceled patient/client?
  • Does your receptionist ask the patient/client to put the appointment in their calendar, phone, or day planner so they won’t forget?
  • Do you keep a record of the reasons behind cancelations for future reference and to implement any needed corrections?
  • Do you have any sort of policy regarding cancelations that is part of the “welcome to the practice” information given to patients/clients?
  • If you have such policy, do you enforce it?

Here are some other questions you should ask yourself as regards appointment no-shows:

  • What actions do you take when someone doesn’t show up for an appointment?
  • Do you call the patient/client after a certain length of time, e.g., 10-15 minutes?
  • Do you have any sort of policy regarding no-shows that is part of the “welcome to the practice” information given to patients/clients?
  • If you have such policy, do you show it to no-show patients/clients the next time they come into the practice?

The doctors we deal with are all asked these simple questions, and many more, when they are dealing with cancelations, no-shows, and reschedules. We recommend that you closely evaluate the management systems and training that you have in place with the staff members involved; then, fix or implement the proper procedures to reduce the number of patients/clients lost. This normally leads to increased production without any increase in marketing or staff expense, which, of course, leads to greater efficiency and net income in a practice.

If you would like more help dealing with canceled or rescheduled appointments or any other management topic, fill out the form to the right, and we will be more than happy to assist you.

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