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14 Steps to Safeguard Your Practice from Embezzlement

Our research staff continues to find that embezzlement is an issue that is still prevalent in practices nationwide. Consequently, we are revisiting this subject to provide additional advice.

 Minimize the Risk

More than likely, you’ve heard the horror story about a colleague whose trusted employee embezzled money from his/her practice. To preclude this from happening to you, there are steps that you could take to minimize the risk of embezzlement.

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We recommend that the following procedures become a part of your normal routine, as they will help to safeguard you from embezzlement. 

Handling Cash

  1. Make it your firm policy that you provide every patient/client with a receipt for cash payments.
  2. Cash handling and cash record keeping duties need to be segregated. Have one person collect patient/client portions over the counter and another person post balances. Have a third person make the bank deposits. As the owner, you must play an active role in monitoring sales and cash if you have too few employees to fully separate those three duties.
  3. Each month, compare the amount of cash deposited in the bank to the receipts and/or balances posted in your collections log. There could be some minor fluctuation, of course, but a significant difference for that month is a warning sign and should be investigated.
  4. Start a simple patient/client sign-in sheet listing patient names and the date signed in. Compare this on a daily basis to an over-the-counter-collections report (and day sheet or equivalent). Look for inconsistencies, such as patients/clients who are on the sign-in sheet but not listed on the day-sheet report. Spot-check by phone call to patients/clients who are reported to not have paid an amount due that day. This can be done as a “quality control” call to the patient/clients. Of the questions asked, one might be something like, “It’s our policy that all patients/clients who pay any cash on the day of service receive a receipt. Did you receive a receipt today for any cash you paid?” Put this policy in writing and IMPLEMENT IT. That will make it far more dangerous to attempt embezzlement.
  5. Make it a written policy that you conduct unannounced checks of petty cash and other cash accounts on a regular (bi-weekly or monthly) basis. Conduct those checks without fail.

Fill out the form on this page to read steps 6-14, they will provide you with the essential data regarding the proper management of your accounts receivable and other office records (highly recommended). Scroll to top

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Read steps 6-14, they will provide you with the essential data regarding the proper management of your accounts receivable and other office records (highly recommended).










Building a Successful Practice Through Efficient Hiring

To build the most productive and profitable practice, having stable staff who work together to accomplish the mission of the practice is vital. Knowing how and whom to hire is a key skill. To lose employees who may have seemed appropriate for your team when you hired them, yet were not actually a good fit once on the job, is an enormous hidden expense in a practice.

In fact, based on the typical costs of finding, interviewing, testing, training and getting a new employee fully functioning on the job, turnover costs can equal six to nine months of the position salary. If a job pays $3000 per month, your costs could be anywhere from $18,000 to $27,000 each time the position turns over. Therefore, it’s vital to know how to screen applicants properly in order to hire the best possible individuals for your practice and to avoid the stress and high cost of frequent turnover.

Checking References

Checking the references that a job applicant provides is an important—but often neglected—step in the hiring process. The quality of staff can make or break a practice; so, investigate carefully and hire only those whose backgrounds indicate competence and imply that they would be good employees.

Checking references is not always an easy process. In order to protect themselves from legal or privacy issues, many employers have become reluctant to voice opinions about a former employee. However, you should still do reference checks on any candidate whom you consider hiring, to gather any data available.

It’s best to check references prior to a one-on-one interview with the applicant, since you might uncover information that will eliminate that candidate beforehand and save you the interview time. If that’s not possible, check references after the interview, but before hiring.

Here are some questions you might ask references:

  • How long was _______ employed by you or your company?
  • Can you tell me his/her ending wage/salary?
  • Why is he/she no longer employed there?
  • Was he/she a loyal employee?
  • Was he/she dependable?
  • Do you feel he/she is honest?
  • Would you rehire this person?

Again, a past employer may not be willing to answer some of those questions. The key question is the last one, “Would you rehire this person?” This question is important to ask if the person providing the reference is very guarded or hesitant in giving answers.

Keep in mind that checking references is just one of several vital steps in the hiring process. Another important part is to determine the attributes your ideal applicant would possess.

Fill out the form on this page to read the rest of the article and receive our Hiring Interview Checklist (highly recommended). Scroll to top

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Read the rest of this article and receive our Hiring Interview Checklist that you can use to determine the characteristics of your ideal employee (highly recommended).